Cement and weather impact Green Bay’s 2015 shipping season

The Port of Green Bay closed the 2015 shipping season with the arrival of a ship carrying salt from Ontario. Overall totals ended the port season with 1.9 million metric tons of cargo, just shy of the 2-million-metric-ton goal and a decrease of 14 percent from 2014.

“Despite the decline, seeing numbers right around the 2 million mark in tonnage is considered a good season,” said Dean Haen, Brown County Port Director. “Considering we anticipated cargo like coal to be down for the season, I’m very happy with where things ended.”

The Port of Green Bay closed the 2015 shipping season with the arrival of a ship carrying salt from Ontario. Overall totals ended the port season with 1.9 million metric tons of cargo, just shy of the 2-million-metric-ton goal and a decrease of 14 percent from 2014.

“Despite the decline, seeing numbers right around the 2 million mark in tonnage is considered a good season,” said Dean Haen, Brown County Port Director. “Considering we anticipated cargo like coal to be down for the season, I’m very happy with where things ended.”

The top performer for 2015 was cement, reporting a 66 percent increase from 2014. “Road projects as well as commercial and residential construction have been on the rise and the demand for cement reflects that,” Haen said.

Foreign imports of salt (266,900 metric tons) and foreign exports of petroleum products (113,000 metric tons) also contributed to good tonnage numbers.

Haen also said the length of the shipping season was a factor. “We were able to start the 2015 season right at the beginning of April and extend the season well into January thanks to mild temperatures earlier this winter,” Haen said. “The mild winter also means we may be seeing another early start for the 2016 season.”

Haen said the success of 2015 makes an even more important statement. “This shows that using waterborne transportation continues to be a valuable asset to businesses,” Haen said. “Businesses are looking for transportation options that are safe, fast and cost-effective and the Port of Green Bay has been able to demonstrate that time and again.”

Overall, Haen said the area is fortunate to have a port that can help businesses thrive, support hundreds of jobs and impact the area economy.

“We can offer businesses a competitive edge when it comes to transportation needs that other cities can’t because of the port,” Haen said. “I’m confident the port will remain a valuable resource because it can meet today’s market demands and has potential to draw new business to the area.”

Maritime Editorial