Port of Oshawa rail spur helps cargo go the distance

It’s been just shy of a year since the official opening of the port’s C$4.1 million rail spur, which is proving to be a crucial link in meeting the growing demands of businesses, most notably the steel industry. So far, the rail spur has carried 41 cars of steel to Western Canada.

“The rail spur is living up to expectations in every way,” said Donna Taylor, President and CEO of the Oshawa Port Authority. “An intermodal, national deep sea port is a real value added for our customers, allowing cargo arriving at our dockside to go the full distance.”

It’s been just shy of a year since the official opening of the port’s C$4.1 million rail spur, which is proving to be a crucial link in meeting the growing demands of businesses, most notably the steel industry. So far, the rail spur has carried 41 cars of steel to Western Canada.

“The rail spur is living up to expectations in every way,” said Donna Taylor, President and CEO of the Oshawa Port Authority. “An intermodal, national deep sea port is a real value added for our customers, allowing cargo arriving at our dockside to go the full distance.”

While the rail spur is helping to serve the needs of Canada’s steel industry, it was designed for far more. The track includes an oversized dimensional move section to accommodate cargo that is too big to move by road. This will allow the Port of Oshawa to move into the niche project cargo market and support plans for a multi-billion dollar refurbishment of the Darlington nuclear power plant.

“The port has made solid gains in the past year and there’s plenty of opportunity for growth,” said Gary Valcour, Chair of the Oshawa Port Authority. “With the expansion of the 407 highway for example, there’s potential to increase the port’s aggregate cargo.”

The port has received expressions of interest from companies looking to take advantage of the port’s recent expansion, from the rail spur to the C$2.5 million cargo pad and 15,000-metric-ton transit shed. With this year’s navigation season still months off, companies have already made commitments to move 60,000 metric tons of cargo through the Port of Oshawa when the St. Lawrence Seaway opens.

“We are extremely excited by the commitments so far,” Taylor said. “By all indications this year’s shipping season will get off to a tremendous start.”

Last year, more than 378,000 metric tons of cargo moved through the Port of Oshawa, up by almost 5.95 percent from the previous year, or over 21,000 metric tons. Learn more here.

Maritime Editorial